Defendant’s Waiver of Grand Jury Indictment

Initially, under the New York Constitution, criminal defendants were unable to waive an indictment by Grand Jury. However, in 1974, the Constitution was amended to permit  waiver so long as a waiver is signed in open court in front of defendant’s counsel. Recently, the Court of Appeals affirmed this practice in People v. Myers (Ct. App. 6/27/2018) (Wilson, J.) (5-2).

Mr. Myers waived his right to an indictment by the Grand Jury and immediately after pleaded guilty to Burglary 3º. Prior to this, Mr. Myers had an opportunity to confer with his counsel off the record, and while the judge called the other cases on the calendar, he had an opportunity to meet with his attorney at the lectern about the waiver form. The judge then asked Mr. Myers’ counsel if he was ready, and when he said yes, the judge signed the order approving the waiver after determining it met the statutory requirements.

Mr. Myers argued that the indictment was invalid because there was no evidence the waiver was executed in open court and there was no conversation with the court on the subject. The Appellate Division upheld the waiver.

New York Constitution, article I, section 6 allows for waiver of a grand jury indictment if it is consented by the district attorney, and “evidenced by written instrument signed by the defendant in open court in the presence of his or her counsel.” In this case, the record shows that the waiver was signed in open court. Mr. Myers’ attorney notarized his signature on the waiver on the date of the court appearance.

The defendant’s argument that there was no inquiry by the court into whether his waiver was knowing and intelligent was unsupported by the New York Constitution, the Court held. Instead, the Court found that the requirements set forth in the statute (signed in open court, in the presence of counsel) were met. Thus, the Court declined to read into the statute the additional requirement of the judge conducting an oral inquiry on the record. The Court noted that “[c]ompliance with the constitutionally-specified waiver mechanism establishes the prima facie validity of the waiver of the right to prosecution by indictment.” There was no evidence on the record that the waiver was involuntary, unknowing, or unintelligent, so the prima facie showing was deemed by the Court to be conclusive.

Therefore, the Court affirmed the order of the Appellate Division but noted:

We emphasize, however, that the better practice—captured in the relevant model colloquy—is for courts to elicit defendants’ understanding of the significance of the right being waived, to minimize future challenges to the effectiveness of the waiver (see Waiver of Indictment; Superior Court Information Procedure & Colloquy, https://www.nycourts.gov/judges/cji/8-Colloquies/ [accessed June 22, 2018]).

Judge Rivera dissented because she believed that “[n]o waiver is valid without sufficient judicial inquiry.” (JC)

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