“Dangerous Contraband”: What is it?

In People v. Flagg (4th Dept. 11/16/2018), the Fourth Department considered a defendant’s appeal despite the lack of preservation and expounded upon what constitutes “dangerous contraband” in a prison.

At the lower court, the defendant was convicted  by a jury of Promoting Prison Contraband 1° and CPCS 7°. These convictions arose after correction officers obtained a disposable glove containing four Tramadol pills from the defendant’s possession, while he was incarcerated at a local jail.

For the crime of Promoting Prison Contraband 1º, the People were required to prove that the defendant was (1) confined in a detention facility, and (2) knowingly and unlawfully made, obtained, or possessed any “dangerous contraband.” Dangerous contraband is defined by the Penal Law as “contraband which is capable of such use as may endanger the safety or security of a detention facility or any person therein.” The test that the Court of Appeals developed in People v. Finley to determine whether a substance is dangerous is “whether its particular characteristics are such that there is a substantial probability that the item will be used in a manner that is likely to cause death or other serious injury, to facilitate an escape, or to bring about other major threats to a detention facility’s institutional safety or security.”

On appeal, the defendant contended that there was legally insufficient evidence to establish that the Tramadol pills were “dangerous.” Although defense counsel moved for a dismissal, the Court noted that this was not enough to preserve the issue for review, but considered the defendant’s appeal in the interest of justice.

The People presented testimony from corrections officers that the pills were dangerous because inmates will fight over the drugs and inmates will also get high and try to fight the staff, or attack other inmates. Additionally, a Sheriff’s detective testified that if not prescribed to the person who was taking the pills, it could cause the person who ingested the pill’s death.

The Court found that this testimony was only discussing broad penological concerns and was speculative and conclusory. The evidence did not establish a substantial probability of a major threat to the facility, or death or serious injury. Specifically, the Court found that there was no specific evidence regarding the dosage of Tramadol or what it would do if ingested by an individual. Thus, the Court found that the People did not establish the “dangerousness” of the pills possessed by the defendant and therefore, the convicted should be reduced to Promoting Prison Contraband 2°.

Further, the Court noted that drugs in it of themselves are not inherently dangerous and the specific use and effects are necessary to show whether or not a drug is dangerous. The Court stated the determination of what types and quantities of drugs are considered dangerous is best left to the legislature. (JC)

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