Category Archives: Juveniles and Youthful Offenders

Old Enough to Know Better, But Not Enough to Warrant a 35-Year Sentence

The Fourth Department in People v. Jones (4th Dept. 11/9/2018) considered whether it should, in its discretion, override the lower court’s decision on two matters: (1) whether the defendant should have been sentenced as a youth offender or as an adult, and (2) whether the sentence imposed was too harsh and excessive. The Court ultimately used its authority to amend the lower court’s decision on the second count in the “interest of justice.”

The defendant was convicted of Assault 1º and two counts of CPW 2º; he committed the crimes when he was 18 years old. Although CPL 720.10(3) provides that “a youth who has been convicted of an armed felony offense . . . is an eligible youth if the court determines that one or more of the following factors exist: (i) mitigating circumstances that bear directly upon the manner in which the crime was committed; or (ii) where the defendant was not the sole participant in the crime, the defendant’s participation was relatively minor although not so minor as to constitute a defense to the prosecution.” Therefore, the only relevant mitigating factors related to a CPL 720.10(3), or “eligible youth,” inquiry revolve around the circumstances of the crime itself, such as “a lack of injury to others or evidence that the defendant did not display a weapon during the crime.” Here, the Fourth Department affirmed the lower court’s decision in trying the defendant as an adult rather than an eligible youth because he carried a loaded gun on several occasions and shot a gang member.

Although the Court decided that trying the defendant as an adult was just, it determined that the 35-year sentence imposed on the defendant was too harsh. As a matter of discretion in the interest of justice, the Fourth Department modified the defendant’s sentence to run for an aggregate term of 25 years. The Court contemplated multiple factors in deciding to reduce the sentence; the defendant’s lack of a criminal record, the fact that the victim was attempting to commit an armed robbery of the defendant’s gang members, and the fact that the People offered a plea constituting a 20-year sentence all contributed to the Court’s decision to impose a more lax sentence.

Two judges dissented to the second part of the majority’s opinion; they did not believe the Court should amend the sentence in any way. This decision was not necessary in the “interest of justice.” Although the dissent noted the defendant’s low intellect and rough childhood, it was of paramount significance that the defendant was a dangerous individual who was known to carry a loaded gun. Thus, he should be “locked up for a long time.”